Title

Koushik
Banerjea

Author

Koushik Banerjea

Welcome

Recent writing history

In a time of monsters

sour face nasal whine

cagey

boxing clever (short teaser) appearing in verbal london books issue 4

slow (short teaser) appearing in verbal london books issue 5

Publications

Fiction

In a time of monsters (Pub 01.12.17 The Write Launch)

sour face nasal whine (Pub 13.9.17 Minor Literatures)

cagey (Pub 23.03.17 Writers Resist)

boxing clever (short teaser) appearing in verbal london books issue 4

slow (short teaser) appearing in verbal london books issue 5

 

Journalism/Creative non-fiction

Editor at large Southern Discomfort webzine

Banerjea, K. www.darkmatter101.org (an independent online journal), 2007 to 2009 (various)

'Second Generation' magazine

The Black Media Journal

Newspapers: East (London); The Telegraph (India)

 

Head scratching stuff

Banerjea, K. “Fight Club: aesthetics, hybridisation, and the construction of Rogue masculinities in Sholay and Deewaar” in Bollyworld: Indian Cinema through a Global lens, Eds Kaur, R and Sinha, A, Permanent Black, New Delhi & London, 2005.

Banerjea, K. “The tyranny of the binary: race, nation and the logic of failing liberalisms” in Ethnic and Racial Studies (July 2002, Vol 25 no 4).               

Banerjea, K. “Sounds of Whose Underground: the fine tuning of diaspora in an age of Mechanical Reproduction” in Theory, Culture and Society (June 2000, Vol. 17 no 3).

Banerjea, K. “Ni-Ten-Ichi-Ryu: Enter the World of the Smart Stepper” in Travel Worlds- Journeys in Contemporary Cultural Politics, Eds Kaur, R and Hutnyk, J, Zed Books, London, 1999.

Banerjea, K. “Sonic Diaspora and its dissident footfalls” in Postcolonial Studies - Culture, Politics, Economy, Volume 1, Number 3, Carfax Publishing, Oxfordshire & Melbourne, 1998.          

Banerjea, K. “Psyche and Soul: a view from the ‘South’” in Dis-Orienting Rhythms – the politics of the New Asian Dance Music, Eds Sharma, Hutnyk, Sharma, Zed Books, London 1996.

Banerjea, K. and Barn, J. “Versioning Terror: Jallianwala Bagh and the Jungle” in Dis-Orienting Rhythms - the politics of the New Asian Dance Music, Eds Sharma, Hutnyk, Sharma, Zed Books, London 1996.

Bio

‘Clean living under difficult circumstances.’.  South London in the 1970s and 1980s was the incubator, but a love of books, words and the escapist properties of alphabet soup were largely instilled in this author by hard working immigrant parents, who envisaged a better life in London than the one they’d been forced to flee as Partition refugees. 

Telling stories (making stuff up), sometimes being quite funny and having the ability to kick, or hit a ball, were the salve for an otherwise skittish, bookish child.  As was a love of music.  The author’s formative years happily coinciding with a peculiarly rich strain of pop cultural invention which was never that far away in his little corner of south London.  In reality this meant being spoilt for choice, and somehow present at the birth pangs of hip hop, as well as at the death throes of punk; being privy to the latest variants of soul, reggae and 2-Tone.  Smiley Culture sharing top billing with the ghost of the Specials at the Lewisham Odeon.  And if he just cared to look up, his ears would be filled by the illicit sounds of Pirate radio in the high rises.  At home, teenage years were marked by the discovery of Sam Selvon and the kitchen sink drama of Squeeze for company – gentle tales of ‘us’ and girls from Clapham, but with added bite and resonance for a kid who wanted something more than the limited possibilities of a particular postcode.  Stories too from his Mum and Dad, of the old country, of something bucolic, before men with maps and ideas of ‘purity’ turned their lives inside out, and set them on their way from one South to another.

Those are the strands that have lived in the author from young, and in one way or another have informed his adult life too.  So the bookishness eventually led to a PhD and the reified turf of academia, while the mischief (and scuffle) of the vernacular found expression in youth work.  Not always a happy fit, the suspicion sometimes lingering in both camps, a la Stringer Bell, that this might be  ‘a man without a country’.  But unlike Stringer, the author is still here, still telling stories, and right now that’s probably enough.